Thursday, January 19, 2012

LAURIE BAKER QUOTES

  • To me probably the most interesting part of designing a building is dealing with the clients— getting to know them, how they live and work and finding out what sort of a building they dream of. It is exciting to put on to paper what you think is in their heads, and then to go on altering or adding or deleting until you think you have put down what they want
  • Bricks to me are like faces. All of them are made of burnt mud, but they vary slightly in shape and colour. I think these small variations give tremendous character to a wall made of thousands of bricks, so I never dream of covering such a unique and characterful creation with plaster, which is mainly dull and characterless. I like the contrast of textures of brick, of stone, of concrete, of wood
  • This common burnt brick is usually pleasing to look at with warm colours ranging from cream, through orange sandy colours to brown and even blue brown. When built into a wall, pleasing and interesting simple patterns appear. Like people who all have one nose, one mouth, two ears and two eyes but no two look exactly the same, so each brick, although so simple in shape, has its own individuality.
  • An equally interesting and absorbing part of practising architecture is translating your two-dimension drawings into three-dimension buildings. I have to be on the site to enjoy this transition from drawings to buildings. Not to be involved in building would be, to me, as foolish as buying a camera and film, viewing and clicking the trigger, getting a negative done, but not getting the print.
  • There's an old saying: manners maketh the man. I think they also make good architecture.
  • Every district has its own traditions and, by trial and error, over thousands of years, people have learned how to use, and to cope with, all the many factors which are involved in Architecture. – The Site, the Topography and Geology. The climate and vegetation, the available local materials – the religious and cultural patterns of living, and the main local occupants. Unsatisfactory items have long since been discarded and alternatives have been tried until a satisfactory solution has been found.
  •  Windows are costly. One square foot of window can cost upto ten times the cost of simple brick or stone wall it replaces. A window has varied functions – to look out of, to let light inside a room, to let in fresh air, or to let out stale air and so on. In many of these situations a ‘Jali’ or ‘honeycombed’ wall is just as effective. Far from being a lot more costly than the basic wall, if made of brick it can be less costly than the house wall!
  •  Most materials have their own special characteristics and if used honestly and simply they contribute to the “looks” of a building merely from their colour, their texture and the patterns formed by joining them together. There is no need to cover them over with costly finishes. Let a brick wall look like a brick wall and a stone wall should look like a stone wall. Concrete should look like concrete and not be plastered or painted to look like marble.
  •  My feeling as an architect is that you're not after all trying to put up a monument which will be remembered as a 'Laurie Baker Building' but Mohan Singh's house where he can live happily with his family

PREPARATION OF AN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

I have been receiving a lot of requests from students for details on HOW TO PREPARE A GOOD ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO. 

Taking this into consideration, I have compiled a detailed booklet on how to create a great portfolio, which will guide you through the detailed process, including identification of materials, ideal layouts, graphics and rendering styles, text placements, photographing your models....an exhaustive list which will guide you step by step.

You can now avail this great resource for creating your best portfolio, which is essential in this highly competitive age - either to get into good firms for internships, applying for your masters or for getting that coveted job.

Get full access to 'How to prepare an Architecture Portfolio' at just Rs.250 !!!

So go ahead and mail me at ar.sujithgs@gmail.com to order today! 

Wednesday, January 11, 2012

REALIZATION HOUSING, AUROVILLE

A very interesting housing project that has come up in Auroville is the ‘Realization’ housing designed & built by the Auroville Earth Institute & Ar.Satprem. One of the reasons why this project is unique is that it is a group housing that is built up with Compressed Stabilised Earth Blocks made locally at the site itself, using the soil dug up for the rainwater harvesting tank. At a time when the entire world is merely paying lip service to ‘sustainability’, the Realization project stands out showing us what true sustainability is. The community is self-sustained, with earth as the primary building material & with energy conservation techniques like Earth cooling tunnels & rainwater harvesting systems being implemented. Moreover, the concept of Realization is unique in itself and as the Realization website (http://www.auroville.info/realization/Home.html) says,
Realization aims to build sustainable and affordable homes for Auroville with people’s participation. It aspires to contribute actively to the development of Auroville as a conscious community and as a city of never ending education. Hence Realization proposes alternatives ways to answer the present housing demand. The neighbouring villages do not have enough labour for the construction sites of Auroville and it is difficult since a few years to find construction workers to build Auroville. Hence Aurovilians, Newcomers and volunteers need to work with their hands for building Auroville.’



Aims & Objectives -
  • Answer the need of housing: about 70 apartments are planned to be built for around 170 people, over several phases in the next 4 to 5 years. The first phase will have 17 apartments for about 25 people.
  • Share resources to help people with low budget: People give what they can: funds and/or work, so that everyone gets an apartment according to their needs and not according to their financial means.
  • Develop a participative process: Individuals are involved in the elaboration and management of the project. Everybody can contribute physically, mentally and spiritually in a collaborative way for the growth and progress of Auroville as a place of never ending education and in a spirit of Human Unity.
  • Build and live in a sustainable and Eco-friendly manner: Appropriate building technologies and renewable energy sources being used include stabilised earth for the main building material, solar and wind energy, recycling wastewater treatments systems, rainwater harvesting systems on the land and on the roofs, etc.
  • Develop community services: For its future residents as well as for the neighbours.




By November of 2007, the initial studies for the project started & by late 2010, the first phase was completed. The initial phase has around 17 apartments for about 25 people, in 3 blocks of apartments organised around a central plaza where a ‘Realization tree’ has been planted. It is as if the buildings rise up from the very ground on which they stand, the rich red of the soil reflected through the CSEB walls of the buildings.
A very interesting concept implemented in Realization is that of the Earth Cooling Tunnels. These are essentially pipes which run under the ground which are used for cooling the interiors of the apartments. They work on the principle that the temperature of the earth at a depth of more than 3 metres is constant at about 27 degrees and in Realization the pipes run at around 6m through the rainwater harvesting tank and come up to the fan in the surface, the result being that the interior temperatures are brought down considerably. This when combined with the rainwater harvesting system, solar energy, windmills etc. make the Realization project truly sustainable, to the extent that the Embodied energy of the buildings are about one-fourth that of a conventional building.
Building a CSEB vault

Building a CSEB vault

Layout plan

Sections & Elevations

Earth Cooling Tunnel

All images courtesy the Realization website
Do check out the following link for more images -  http://www.auroville.info/realization/Gallery.html



PREPARATION OF AN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

I have been receiving a lot of requests from students for details on HOW TO PREPARE A GOOD ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO. 

Taking this into consideration, I have compiled a detailed booklet on how to create a great portfolio, which will guide you through the detailed process, including identification of materials, ideal layouts, graphics and rendering styles, text placements, photographing your models....an exhaustive list which will guide you step by step.

You can now avail this great resource for creating your best portfolio, which is essential in this highly competitive age - either to get into good firms for internships, applying for your masters or for getting that coveted job.

Get full access to 'How to prepare an Architecture Portfolio' at just Rs.250 !!!

So go ahead and mail me at ar.sujithgs@gmail.com to order today! 

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

BACKPACKING IN INDIA - things to consider

By SUJITH.G.S

    India is a country that often overwhelms you – a place so beautiful and natural, yet growing at a rapid pace, only now coming to grips with globalisation and the facebook age. For most parts, it is still pristine and unspoilt. Yet, it is one of the most diverse country anywhere – people, customs, religions, food, climate...all vary from one place to another, yet, co-exist in the vibrant microcosm that is India.

    One of the most inspiring experiences is to travel throughout the length and the breadth of the country to witness the magic that is India, backpacking across the country to really immerse yourself in its culture. It is a journey that will be personally enriching. I have put down a list of things from my own journeys that may be helpful to other like-minded travellers. So here goes -

1.    First things first. Pack light. This is one of the cardinal rules while backpacking. There is no point burdening yourself with a heavy backpack. Carry only essential items. Plan your travels such that they are resource efficient, even in terms of clothes.

2.    Get a good map of the places you intend to visit. It should be small enough to be folded and carried in your pocket. Get a good Lonely Planet for India as it provides good relevant details.

3.   Always try out the local cuisines and foods. And as far as possible, eat from the local eateries and hotels where the local people throng. Food is one of the best ways to discover a place and you will be able to strike up interesting conversations with the locals and in the process, often learn about interesting places & events to visit, which may not be on the tourist maps. Lonely Planet World Food India is a very useful guide to have with you.

4.    People, especially local people are one of the most interesting aspects of travelling. Learn about them, talk to them to find out their ways of lives, customs, beliefs etc. You might even be lucky enough to be invited into a local home for a meal!!

5.    Before setting out, do a bit of research about your destination. Note down a few interesting places that you need to visit, tentative accomodation places etc. But keep your research basic. You tend to get better deals sniffing around the actual place.

6.    Try not to rigidly plan your itenary beforehand itself. Think and plan on your feet. There will always be certain places where you would want to spend more time and also those places, which might not be worth spending so much time. So its important that you are flexible enough in your plans.

7.    Always remember that it is not the number of places that you’ve been to that is important. Travelling is about the journey and not the destination, about your experiences, about discovery, about learning. It is also about discovering yourself. So travel with an open mind to experience the real India.

8.    Always keep some buffer time in your travel. Do not plan your travels such that the transport connections are too tight. If you miss one of your targeted transports, it may end up spoiling your entire trip. Also try to be early for all your journeys.

9.    Try travelling sleeper class in the trains as much as possible. Not only is it cheap, you get to meet a lot of interesting people and hear interesting stories. Only thing, book your tickets in advance.(train timings usually go haywire in winter in the northern part of the country due to fog. So if you are travelling during that time, be prepared for delays). Book all your tickets through the Indian railway's website http://www.irctc.co.in/. That way you can stay clear of travel agents. Also, always plan your travels during the night, as overnight journeys saves time and also the cost of accomodation!

10. Use public transport. There is nothing as interesting as a crowded vehicle with locals vying for space. Slightly uncomfortable maybe, but worth the experience.

11. For overnight accommodation, various options like youth hostels, dormitories etc are available almost all over the country. Getting a youth hostel membership is always a good idea, as it is valid all over the country.(http://www.yhaindia.org/memberships/). The facilities are usually decent and it is easy on the pocket too. If possible, try to stay with local families. This is a great way to learn of the local customs and people. Make sure though that your place of accommodation is centrally located, to avoid unnecessary hassles in travelling and wastage of time.

12. Always check out the facilities offered before you pay money and accept the accommodation, as often, what is promised may be different from what is offered.

13. If you are planning to travel to the north India during winter, make sure that your place of accommodation offers hot water.

14. Find out about the check in and checkout times beforehand itself and plan accordingly. Also, find out if there is a closing time in the night. You do not want to get caught out in the night (as it once happened to me and my friend  in a freezingly cold Chandigarh night)

15. Try to avoid autorickshaws as far as possible unless you really have to. One of the things that is surprisingly common all over India is the tendency of the rickshaw drivers to cheat and overcharge (all though this is not true always, and in all places. Mumbai is an exception).

16. If you need to get an auto or a cycle rickshaw from the railway station, always step out of the station first and get a vehicle. The rickshaw drivers in the station will certainly overcharge you. Nowadays most of the stations have got a pre-paid facility. Try to get your auto from there only.

17. Check out the weather forecasts in advance. Extreme climate is one of the major deterrents while travelling. There is no point if your plans go for a toss due to heavy rains, unbearable cold etc. That being said, weather in India is one of the most unpredictable entities. So dont be disappointed if you find yourself in the middle of a downpour when the forecast was for a clear day!

18. Choose your clothes according to the weather conditions. Loose ones for hotter climates and ofcourse heavy ones for the cold. A small towel is also a handy item.

19. A good cap is handy especially in warmer places.

20. Wear a comfortable pair of shoes or sandals. They must be hardy enough to put up with some good walking. 

21. Always carry a good amount of water with you and keep yourself hydrated. Distilled water is available everywhere nowadays.

22. Walk as much as possible. It is one of the best ways to discover a place, to really get to discover it at your own pace.

23. Carry a few basic medicines like those for fever, indigestion etc.

24. Stay away from guided tours as far as possible. Your Lonely Planet would be a very trusted companion to carry around.

25. Always try out the local tea. It varies across the country in very interesting ways.

26. Keep good care of your luggage while travelling. Do not discuss your plans in detail with strangers, especially on the train. Carry a metallic chain of around 2 feet length and a small lock. This can be used to secure your lugguage at night in the train. Be bold but try to travel safe. Avoid volatile situations; try not to get into arguments or fights. Always remember that you are the outsider here, but do not be pushed over by others. Be stern when you have to.

27. Always respect local customs and practices. You are the outsider and have to respect things even if it may not make sense to you.

28. Charge your mobiles and cameras as required. It is disappointing to find that your camera charge has died down in the middle of an exciting journey. Always carry your chargers with you and keep your batteries fully charged. Railways coaches do have charging points, but it is best not to totally rely on them alone. It is always a great idea to carry a portable powerbank with you.

29. Also ensure that there is adequate space in your camera for all your clicking. So download and free space inside your camera prior to starting out. Carry a good quality external Hard-disk to back up all your data.

30. Try not to use your camera inside the train, if possible. If it is a day journey only, then you may use your camera. But if it involves night travel also, try to avoid showing your camera outside, as you never know if someone may try to steal it in the night.

31. Carry only the minimum amount of cash as required. ATMs are common all across the country and there is no point losing sleep over the cash in your pocket. But make sure that if you are going to visit places outside the city, you have adequate money to take you through and also something extra for emergencies. In cities, there are money exchange facilities for the foreign travellers.

32. Do not litter, damage or create nuisance in any of the places that you visit. Scribbling on the walls of the monuments is totally uncool.

33. Language might be an issue while you are travelling in India. For the northern part of the country, if you know even rudimentary Hindi, you will do fine. English may not be always understood. For the southern part, if you know English you will be all right. Hindi isn’t understood as much. Yet, the main thing to remember is that language isn’t a barrier if you really want to travel. We Indians are very good at understanding and expressing ourselves in signs and broken words.

34. Always ask and speak to local people for directions and help. You will be amazed to find the hospitality shown to travellers all over the country.

35.Buy only those souvenirs which will not be a hindrance to your travels. Also, always bargain, as we Indians love a good bargain.

36.There are some great out of the way places in India. Sure the common tourist attractions do have their own charm, but there are plenty of quiet, beautiful places away from the maddening crowds which are even more enchanting. So do check out them out for a really satisfying experience.

37. Carry a good travelogue with you. It will be a great companion to have during your journeys. William Dalrymple has written some really amazing books on his travels through India. The 'Age of Kali', 'City of Djinns' and 'Nine Lives' are some of my personal favorites. 'Chasing the Monsoon' is another good book to have.

98.Finally, learn to let go. There will be lot of situations which will be beyond your control. Be prepared to take these in your stride; or else, you'll end up spoiling your time and not enjoying your trip. Travel with an open mind and rest assured; you wont be disappointed!!


PREPARATION OF AN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

I have been receiving a lot of requests from students for details on HOW TO PREPARE A GOOD ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO. 

Taking this into consideration, I have compiled a detailed booklet on how to create a great portfolio, which will guide you through the detailed process, including identification of materials, ideal layouts, graphics and rendering styles, text placements, photographing your models....an exhaustive list which will guide you step by step.

You can now avail this great resource for creating your best portfolio, which is essential in this highly competitive age - either to get into good firms for internships, applying for your masters or for getting that coveted job.

Get full access to 'How to prepare an Architecture Portfolio' at just Rs.250 !!!


So go ahead and mail me at ar.sujithgs@gmail.com to order today! 

Monday, January 9, 2012

HUMAYUN'S TOMB, DELHI

Who would've thought that there would be a structure similar to the Taj in pretty much all respects??(except the marble of course!)..well, tucked away in a corner in the Nizamuddin area in Delhi is the tomb of emperor Humayun. This can rightly be said as the precursor to the Taj. The proportions are slightly different but the overall effect is no less imposing than that of the Taj. I particularly liked the combination of white marble & red sandstone, which is done pretty neatly...






The elements of symmetry, perspective, attention to detail, magnificent jaali openings, monumental scale, sense of place.....the simple beauty of the building is delightful.
You must give it to the Mughals for making a statement.

Somehow, for me personally, I actually liked the Humayun's Tomb more than the Taj Mahal(oops..!!). Must be 'cause of the larger colour palette..I think the Taj is much more of an idea, the romantic story of the emperor who built the monument in memory of his wife....is that what makes it 'more' special? If you kind of overlook those facts, somehow the Humayun's tomb made more sense to me as an aesthetic composition. Of course the Taj is much more refined in terms of its proportions, approach etc, mainly as it was built a lot later when the Mughals had perfected their craft. However, the 'blunt' beauty of the Humayun's tomb has a special appeal.






PRECASTING & PREFABRICATION

Prefabrication or Precasting is essentially the creation of units & elements (most often concrete elements) either in a factory or in a site yard instead of casting them in-situ at the required place. Once the elements are cast, they are cured properly and then lifted / placed into position during the time of construction. In building construction, the most common precast elements are wall panels, roof panels, beams, staircases, domes, retaining walls, even furnitures. Nowadays in the infrastructure segments almost all construction elements of flyovers, bridges etc are precast & then erected into position. Through precasting, we are able to avoid time consuming activities like shuttering, formworks, placing of concrete etc. leading to faster completion of projects . Also, it is possible to have a much better quality control & even reduce wastages thereby reducing the construction costs.
Precast Roofing elements in Bangalore International Airport

Precast Roofing elements in Bangalore International Airport

A Precast Staircase in AEI, Auroville
One of the basic principles of precasting is that the entire design has to be modular. By modular I mean that the different elements have to be standardised to uniform dimensions, specification etc. So that it will be easier to fabricate. It is also possible to prefabricate a few design elements alone in a building, but even then it has to be well thought out right from the design stage itself. Details like how to join the precast element with adjacent elements will have to be properly designed. During the construction phase proper planning has to be done to ensure smooth execution. So even things like planning the location of the precast yard plays an important role as that will decide the distance the precast element will have to be lifted & transported. Also, a workable design of the mould for precasting will have to be done as the mould is very important in how the final quality if the elements turn out.
ADVANTAGES OF PRECASTING –
  • Ensures better quality - It is possible to have a good quality control over the entire process especially since the process is repetitive. Thus, it is possible to have good control & supervision of the quality of moulds used, quality of materials used, proper placing of materials, proper curing after placing etc and ensure that the elements are of good quality.
  • Savings in time – Time consuming activities like shuttering, scaffolding, formwork, deshuttering etc can be totally eliminated. Also, since the process is repetitive, the cycle times generally tend to improve as productivity increases.
  • Independent of other activities – Once the precast yard is established, we can start manufacturing of precast elements even before the actual start of other building works. Thus, proper control of the construction activities is possible.
  • Savings in cost – if the design of the precast elements are done properly, a lot of optimisation can be done in materials, dimensions etc, which will help in reducing the cost. Savings are also made on cost of shuttering, scaffolding etc. The formworks used in precasting can be used for a much larger number of repetitions compared to cast in-situ work. Also, indirectly, faster completion of projects will ensure faster occupation of buildings and hence quicker return of capital invested.
  • Clean work fronts – usually since all the elements are precast, the in-situ work done at site is reduce leading to a much cleaner work area.

Precast Treads

Mould for precast Ferrocement channel
Precast septic tank in CSR, Auroville

ADDITIONAL THINGS TO BE CONSIDERED –
  • Lifting requirements – all precast elements will be lifted and then placed into position. For this, additional strengthening & lifting hooks will have to be designed & provided before casting itself.
  • Proper Planning – the entire process of precasting & also the subsequent erection will have to be carefully planned to avoid unnecessary delays & problems. Also, once the precast elements are ready for erection, their storage becomes crucial. Thus, the precast production & subsequent installation are to be planned very carefully to ensure a smooth construction process. This is very important as storage spaces in a construction site are always at a premium. So if quantity of precast elements manufactured are more and are not used immediately for construction, lot of storage space will be required which will lead to complications. Also, the lifting & erection process will also have to be planned carefully
  • Joints – Additional care will have to be taken to ensure that the joints of the precast elements are done properly and are waterproofed properly to avoid leakages.
Basic sequence of works in making a concrete precast element in a nutshell–
  • Establishing the precasting yard & preparation of the moulds. The formwork or moulds are to be made in the negative shape of the elements and are to be structurally sound to take up the load of the element.
  • Tying of the reinforcement as per the structural reinforcement details.
  • Placing of the reinforcement on the mould ensuring provision for suitable cover is to be supported in correct position to avoid displacement during placement of concrete. Along with this, lifting inserts should also be placed & fixed properly to the reinforcement.
  • Placing of concrete & suitable compaction using vibrators. Concrete must be placed in a uniform manner & properly spread over the area before commencing vibration.
  • Curing of the element on the mould till the initial setting is achieved for lifting the element from the mould.
  • Removing the element from the mould & carrying out the final curing. The strength, watertightness and durability of concrete depends on the concrete being adequately cured. Curing agents may be used for this purpose.
  • Proper storage of the precast elements in the yard. The storage area should be large enough for elements to be stored properly with adequate room for lifting equipments like cranes.

Saturday, January 7, 2012

PADMANABHAPURAM PALACE

The quintessential example of the vernacular architecture of Kerala is the Padmanabhapuram palace complex, located in Thuckalay of Tamilnadu, very adjacent to the Kerala border. Founded by the royal family of Travancore, the initial structures of the complex date from 1400s, with other buildings added incrementally over time. It is one of the best examples of wooden architecture that has come to symbolise the vernacular architecture of Kerala. The palace complex is a masterpiece - an intriguing play of volumes, scale, spatial planning & courtyards, all of which have a strong underlying cohesiveness. The spaces move from the public spaces on the periphery to the more private spaces as one moves towards the core, reflected through variations in scale & proportion, producing very interesting spaces





The entrance to the complex is from the west, through a formal version of the ‘Padipura’ or the entrance gate, which is common in all the traditional dwellings of Kerala. The central locus of the entire composition is the Mother’s palace or the ‘Thai Kottaram’, around which all the other spaces are organised. There are separate halls for audiences & gatherings, a large dance hall, feeding halls of various sizes, kitchen, residences for the king & other dignitaries, weapons store, bath houses, offices and even a temple. There is also a 4 storeyed ‘Upprika Malika’ in the complex, constructed in the 1740s, which is a testament to the technological progress at that time. A 300 year old clock tower in the palace stands witness to the march of time and is still now in good working condition.  Though there is no formal symmetrical spatial layout to be found as such, there lies a strong organisation principle, which creates a very coherent & unifying whole. The various built spaces are interlinked & accessed through a series of courtyards & open spaces which vary volumetrically & in scale depending upon the level of privacy required, most often, being very intimate in nature.
The roof forms are the most dominating element in the whole complex, which through their wonderful juxtaposition creates an impressive visual composition – an ever changing play of light, shadow & mass. The columns are mainly in wood & stone and support the wooden roof structure, which has been designed very creatively to be functional as well as aesthetic. There are strict rules & canons laid down in the ancient building science of Vastu Shastra, regarding the use of wood, techniques of joints, angles of roof forms etc, which have been religiously followed over the various periods during which the complex was built. The overall effect of this being that there exist cohesiveness throughout the structures, rendering them timeless.




The walls are usually made in laterite or brick & plastered over with lime. There are non-structural wooden screens called jaalis, which have the function of allowing in light & ventilation while ensuring the privacy of the person inside. The filtered light creates a dramatic play of light & shadow in the interiors and ensures a very cool & comfortable ambience inside, away from the blazing sun. The shaded interiors are cool, which is a direct derivative of the climatological need to counter the warm humid tropical climate. Indeed, one of the most significant aspects of the design is the sensitive handling of the light & shadows to create a wholesome comfortable ambience inside, one that focuses inside, calming, soothing & contemplating.
The flooring is unique and is black in colour, retaining a mirror like polish even now after so many centuries. It is said that the flooring was done using a mixture of different structures like burnt coconut shells, egg whites, plant juices etc.





Indeed, the Padmanabhapuram palace, with its amazing vocabulary of sloped tiled roofs, intricate jaali works, mysterious corridors, intimate courtyards, amazing woodwork, play of light and shadow, comfortable interior spaces etc, is a timeless architectural marvel and is a stark reminder to us of our rich tradition of innovativeness, respect to nature and search for perfection. The graceful simplicity of the complex stands as a dignified beacon, a reminder of what we should strive for in these times of mindless architectural gimmicks.
All images courtesy - Rajdatta Dewang



All Plans, Sections & Elevations courtesy - MIMAR - 'An Indian Portfolio - Padmanabhapuram palace' - by Raj Rewal, K.T.Ravindran & the Architectural Research Cell



PREPARATION OF AN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

I have been receiving a lot of requests from students for details on HOW TO PREPARE A GOOD ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO. 

Taking this into consideration, I have compiled a detailed booklet on how to create a great portfolio, which will guide you through the detailed process, including identification of materials, ideal layouts, graphics and rendering styles, text placements, photographing your models....an exhaustive list which will guide you step by step.

You can now avail this great resource for creating your best portfolio, which is essential in this highly competitive age - either to get into good firms for internships, applying for your masters or for getting that coveted job.

Get full access to 'How to prepare an Architecture Portfolio' at just Rs.250 !!!

So go ahead and mail me at ar.sujithgs@gmail.com to order today!